!Extreme Shakespeare!

I had an idea for a workshop, then I had another idea and the collision – or was it collusion? – resulted in “Shakespeare’s Archetypes”, a two day fully immersive program that involves playing with a number of different Archetypes, while experimenting with some of the Original Shakespeare Co’s “rules of the game”. That seemed like a pretty good plan, but this morning two more thoughts crashed into each other inside my brain (or maybe my heart) and the result is “Extreme Shakespeare”. Thought No 1 was a reaction to Casus‘s beautiful show, Knee Deep, at the Judy last week.  The four performers are technically superb, and because of the way they work together, subtly caring and daring at the same time, they are …

Thinking Cooling Thoughts

Winter is definitely here, even though anyone from northern Europe might be forgiven for thinking it’s just a mild summer. But it’s cold enough to warrant a hot water bottle for my feet at night, and to get me treading the treadmill to warm them up during the day. Now that the Voice Class (Term 2) has finished, and my thesis handed down, my thoughts are turning to all the possible projects I can dream up, and there are many of them.  It is vital, therefore, that I keep a cool head! I’m planning a rather exciting workshop for next month, details will follow soon.  Registered Being in Voice members receive their promised advance notification today, and the page will …

Doing it anyway, in the face of fear

Just watched a very disturbing Ted Talk, in which the speaker proposes that if we all lose our fear of failure we can change the world – and that’s all you have to do. She’s speaking from the position of working with one of the world’s best funded Defence research institutions, where the failure concerned doesn’t seem to have any personal consequences other than the odd night of disturbed sleep. As for the rest of us, especially performers, fear of failure generally involves more than that. First and foremost there is the fear of looking like an idiot in front of an audience. There’s the financial cost, the time and energy lost as well as the disappointment that can be …

Theatre as Protest Alive and Well

There’s an interesting and provocative blog post up over at Belt Up Theatre that prompted me to join in.  The tenor of their argument is that if government funding for the arts, arts education and arts training generally dries up, then the arts will dry up. While I agree with their assertion that artists will find it harder to make a living, and audiences will be harder to attract if the government (aka society itself) refuses to contribute to the very real financial costs of creating and presenting theatre, I can’t agree that theatre will die out.  There have been harder periods for creative artists throughout humanity’s evolution, and still live performance continues to exist, mostly to entertain but frequently …