It's all decided!

Yes, I’ve finally decided what I want to be when I grow up – nah, only joking. I have decided, though, that the Acting Class Term 3 will run for 6 (that’s SIX) sessions, beginning on August 23 and finishing on September 27. We will work on a different Archetype each week, that means six Archetypes, with a good 3 hours each week to get them deeply experienced in the body, and deeply sounded in the voice. Boy, will we have Some Fun! Hope to see you there…  if I can ever get RapidWeaver to publish the revised information. So, here is the deal: Term 3 THE ARCHETYPAL ACTOR Sunday 23 August to Sunday 27 September 9.00 am to 12.30 …

Change is a-foot

If you have visited the website lately, you will have noticed that the timetable for next term’s Acting Class keeps changing.  Well, it’s about to change again, because I have now been advised by Metro Arts that they have a room for us right through till the end of November.  So, I’m now thinking about whether we will have a break (those who decide to join the Class for both terms) or whether we won’t. In either case, we’ll be having a lot of fun. I’m off to Seattle next week, then to New York for the VASTA conference, where the main presenters will be Catherine Fitzmaurice, Kristen Linklater and Patsy Rodenburg, with Arthur Lessac giving the Keynote Speech. Can …

Ruminating on Rodenburg

Before I head off to the States to attend the VASTA conference, I thought I would re-read Patsy Rodenburg’s book The Actor Speaks, as she will be one of the guest presenters at the conference. “An unfettered voice, powered by breath and free of tension, is the ideal we strive for from the first day of class” (p5) Lots to think about, just in that one sentence. The word ‘unfettered’ pings out at me with the image of fetters, or chains, falling away, leaving the voice, finding itself released from the dungeon, rubbing its (metaphorical, of course) wrists and ankles, standing up to stretch itself, feeling all its joints aching as it tries to move for the first time in …

Voice and Character

One of the most common questions I am asked is “how do I find my Character’s voice”, to which I usually reply, find the physicality of the character, and the voice happens. One thing is for sure, if you try to invent a voice, all you will end up with is an invented voice.  Your audience will probably think you are very clever at ‘doing voices’, but if so, it means they have been distracted from the content of your performance by the ‘voice’. Recently, I saw a production which I found interesting, engaging and intriguing, for many reasons. It was a well-crafted script, by a new young writer. The subject matter was meant to be ‘provocative’ – the publicity …